‘When Apollo Came to Idaho’ Looks at the Early Days (and Future) of Astronaut Training

Some of America’s best-known astronauts visited Idaho in 1969 to train for their moon missions. But for many years, the small, supporting role Idaho played in the Apollo lunar program was unappreciated, misunderstood, even ignored.

Idaho Experience explores NASA’s past — and future — training and research at Idaho’s Craters of the Moon National Monument in When Apollo Came to Idaho. Tune in or stream it Thursday, Sept. 5, at 8:30 PM. IdahoPTV Passport members can stream the program beginning Thursday, Aug. 29!

“The 1969 visit was part of a smart, deliberate strategy by NASA to teach geology to this corps of pilots selected as the first astronauts,” says producer Bill Manny. “These guys were, after all, going on the grandest geology field trip of all time. NASA had the astronauts visit volcanic sites all over southeast Idaho, and geological sites all over the world.”

What makes this a story worth retelling is that the space-research relationship continues at Craters of the Moon, where the varied and hostile landscape is being used to prepare scientists and astronauts for future missions to Mars.

Major funding for Idaho Experience is provided by the J.A. and Kathryn Albertson Family Foundation. Additional funding is provided by Anne Voillequé and Louise Nelson, Judy and Steve Meyer, the Futura Corporation, the Richard K. and Shirley S. Hemingway Foundation, the Friends of Idaho Public Television, the Idaho Public Television Endowment, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Over-the-air Signal Change Coming to Priest Lake

On August 6 or 7, the Idaho Public Television signal broadcasting to the Priest Lake area will change.

Following this re-channeling of translator K42GT-D, viewers in the Priest Lake area who receive IdahoPTV via an over-the-air antenna will lose their signal and will need to perform a “rescan” of their TV tuners to find the updated signal. After rescanning, viewers will continue to receive IdahoPTV on broadcast channel 26.

Information on performing a rescan is located here: fcc.gov/rescan.

Here is some background on why this is happening: translator K42GT-D is currently broadcasting on frequency channel 42 (received by TV tuners as channel 26). Telecommunications company T-Mobile has purchased that frequency and is paying for IdahoPTV to relocate to a new channel. The new translator (K36PW-D) will broadcast on frequency channel 36, which will continue to be received by TV tuners as channel 26.

In 2017, as part of the FCC’s nationwide Broadcast Spectrum Incentive Auction, T-Mobile purchased spectrum in the 600 MHz block across the continental United States to bolster their cellular network. The Priest Lake translator sits in the middle of T-Mobile’s purchased spectrum and is required to change channels or terminate operations entirely. IdahoPTV was successful in applying for and receiving a new channel assignment to continue broadcasting in the area.

“A nod should be given to T-Mobile in that they graciously offered to pay for the equipment and services necessary to relocate our service to a new channel,” says Rich Van Genderen, IdahoPTV’s director of technology. “So although this is an inconvenience, at least it isn’t an unfunded mandate for us to meet.”

Over-the-air Signal Change Coming to Rexburg

On August 14, the Idaho Public Television signal broadcasting to the Rexburg area will be re-channeled.

Following the re-channeling, viewers in the Rexburg translator area who receive IdahoPTV via an over-the-air antenna will lose their signal and will need to perform a “rescan” of their TV tuners in order to receive the updated signal. After rescanning, viewers will continue to find IdahoPTV on broadcast channel 10.

Information on performing a rescan is located here: fcc.gov/rescan.

Here is some background on why this is happening: the South Menan Butte translator (K43JD-D) that serves the Rexburg area is currently broadcasting on frequency channel 43 (received by TV tuners as channel 10). Telecommunications company T-Mobile has purchased that frequency and is paying for IdahoPTV to relocate to a new channel. IdahoPTV elected to relocate their translator to North Menan Butte, which is located closer to Rexburg. The new translator (K20MQ-D) will broadcast on frequency channel 20, which will continue to be received by TV tuners as channel 10.

In 2017, as part of the FCC’s nationwide Broadcast Spectrum Incentive Auction, T-Mobile purchased spectrum in the 600 MHz block across the continental United States to bolster their cellular network. The Rexburg translator sits in the middle of T-Mobile’s purchased spectrum and is required to change channels or terminate operations entirely. IdahoPTV was successful in applying for and receiving a new channel assignment to continue broadcasting in the area.

“A nod should be given to T-Mobile in that they graciously offered to pay for the equipment and services necessary to relocate our service to a new channel,” says Rich Van Genderen, IdahoPTV’s director of technology. “So although this is an inconvenience, at least it isn’t an unfunded mandate for us to meet.”

Join us for ‘Kids Day’ at the Spirit of Boise Balloon Classic!

The Spirit of Boise Balloon Classic in Ann Morrison Park begins with CapEd Kids Day on Wednesday, August 28, from 6:45 to 8:45 AM. Kids can enjoy free tethered rides aboard one of the many hot-air balloons. There will also be various activities for children available throughout Ann Morrison Park.

Find the CapEd Credit Union chalet and take home a fun and awesome activity from Idaho Public Television’s education team. This year’s activity is a Ziploc bag rocket launcher project that kids can build and launch themselves! We hope to see you there.

Join Us in Eastern Idaho for a Community Reception!

Viewers in the Pocatello and Idaho Falls areas, you’re invited to join us for a casual reception with General Manager Ron Pisaneschi, Executive Producer Bruce Reichert, Idaho Public Television Board of Directors and staff.

Following the reception, enjoy an update on all that your support makes possible. We’ll also share a sneak peek of upcoming local and national productions from IdahoPTV and PBS, including a 30-minute preview of Ken Burns’ 16-hour documentary Country Music, which will begin airing in September.

Join us for hosted hors d’oeuvres and no-host bar. The events are free, but seating is limited. Please register online by Wednesday, August 21. Please phone us at (800) 543-6868 with any questions. We hope to see you there!

Over-the-air Signal Change in Bonners Ferry

On July 23, the Idaho Public Television signal broadcasting to the Bonners Ferry area will be re-channeled.

Following the re-channeling, viewers in the Bonners Ferry translator area who receive IdahoPTV via an over-the-air antenna will lose their signal and will need to perform a rescan of their TV tuner in order to receive the updated channel. After rescanning, viewers will continue to find IdahoPTV on broadcast channel 26.

Information on performing a rescan is located here: fcc.gov/rescan.

Here is some background on why this is happening: the Black Mountain translator that serves the Bonners Ferry area is currently broadcasting the IdahoPTV signal on frequency channel 44 (received by TV tuners as channel 26). Telecommunications company T-Mobile has purchased that frequency and is paying for us to relocate to a new channel (frequency channel 24, which will continue to be received by TV tuners as channel 26).

In 2017, as part of the FCC’s nationwide Broadcast Spectrum Incentive Auction, T-Mobile purchased spectrum in the 600 MHz block across the continental United States to bolster their cellular network. The Bonners Ferry translator sits in the middle of T-Mobile’s purchased spectrum and is required to change channels or terminate operations entirely.  IdahoPTV was successful in applying for and receiving a new channel assignment to continue broadcasting in the area.

“A nod should be given to T-Mobile in that they graciously offered to pay for the equipment and services necessary to relocate our service to a new channel,” says Rich Van Genderen, IdahoPTV’s director of technology. “So although this is an inconvenience, at least it isn’t an unfunded mandate for us to meet.”

Explore the Arts in Idaho With New Local Productions

Two new films from Idaho Public Television explore the craftsmanship and history revealed by works of Idaho artisans — and IdahoPTV Passport members have an opportunity to watch both films before they air!

“Crafting a Living” on Outdoor Idaho (airs Thursday, July 25, at 8 PM) introduces three Idaho artisans who craft their living making unique creations out of raw materials and found objects from the land. Master bladesmith Bill Burke forges Damascus steel knives that are literally works of art. Mixed-media artist Ashley Delonas combines crystals and stained glass with shedded antlers from moose, elk and deer. Leatherworker Cary Schwarz makes handcrafted saddles revered for their durability and intricate designs. Watch it online here.

In “Out of the Shadows” on Idaho Experience (airs Thursday, July 25, at 8:30 PM), producer Marcia Franklin brings to light the stories of two female photographers at the turn of the 20th century — Jane Gay and Benedicte Wrensted — as well as the subjects of their images: members of Idaho’s Nez Perce and Shoshone-Bannock tribes. Franklin talks with scholars who have studied both women, as well as Nez Perce and Shoshone-Bannock tribal members, some of whom are pursuing the art of photography. Watch it online here.

Early viewing for IdahoPTV Passport members begins July 18! Members of our Passport streaming service can stream both films a week before they air, either online or through the PBS Video app. To become a Passport member, visit our website.