‘American Graduate’ Helps Prepare Young Idahoans for High-Demand Jobs

GradNationBanner

Idaho Public Television today announced the launch of American Graduate: Getting to Work, a career readiness initiative that will produce local content focused on helping young people obtain the skills needed for high-demand jobs.

Preparing workers for so-called “middle-skills” jobs, which require training but not a four-year college degree, is becoming a priority in many communities. Those careers — such as electricians, dental hygienists, paralegals, construction workers and police officers — make up the largest part of the labor market in all 50 states, according to the National Skills Coalition.

IdahoPTV has begun working with community partners — Idaho Department of Labor, Idaho Career and Technical Education, Idaho Workforce Development Council, and Idaho State Board of Education with projects such as the Next Steps Idaho website and the Idaho Career Information System portal — to assess workforce needs and determine the best strategies through which to illuminate the pathways to post-secondary education and career placement.

Over the next two years, new locally produced content will be added to the American Graduate website idahoptv.org/americangraduate and shared on social media. Content will include video interviews with Idaho students, employers, teachers, counselors and parents sharing stories and information to help young people navigate the paths to their chosen careers.

American Graduate: Getting to Work is made possible by a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB). IdahoPTV is one of 19 public media stations nationwide to receive a grant of between $170,000 and $200,000. The station previously aired American Graduate Day programming and produced American Graduate Champion videos celebrating local mentors, but this is its first time requesting a grant. With the funds, IdahoPTV has hired multimedia producer Andy Lawless to create original content and to work with community partners to develop strategies for reaching young people.

“I’m excited to explore the opportunities available to folks entering the workforce here in Idaho and tell those stories,” Lawless says. “There’s a perception that in order to have a good career, a four-year degree is required, which for many is cost prohibitive. But with Idaho’s 17 career and technical schools, we see a variety of ways in which people can affordably fast-track their way to a great skills-based career, whether it be in health sciences, manufacturing, business, technology or agriculture. My hope is that by fulfilling the initiative of the American Graduate grant, and informing the public about the pathways to high-demand jobs, we’re able to help people find a better place in the workforce and improve their lives.”

A recent study by the United Way shows that even with 4 percent unemployment in Idaho, 40 percent of households cannot afford basic needs such as housing, food, health care and transportation. Lawless says that some of that can be attributed to Idaho’s workforce not having the training necessary to fill those middle-skilled, in-demand jobs that offer higher pay.

Even though pursuing a certificate or two-year degree requires an initial investment of time and funds, 96 percent of technical college students found jobs or began military careers, or continued their education, according to Idaho Career and Technical Education.

In an April interview with the trade journal Current, IdahoPTV General Manager Ron Pisaneschi and Jeff Tucker, the station’s director of content services, discuss the benefits of increased technical training to Idaho employers, especially in the state’s rural areas. Tucker notes the collaboration between yogurt manufacturer Chobani, which recently announced a $20 million expansion of its facility in Twin Falls, and a community college that is teaching workers how to program and operate specialized equipment at the plant.

Pisaneschi explains how traditional industries like logging benefit from middle-skills training programs. “This isn’t your father’s or grandfather’s idea of a logger,” he says. “This work is computerized and uses lasers. In the old days, all you needed was to enjoy physical labor outdoors. Now it involves high-tech skills.” Pisaneschi also stresses the importance of technical training for the sustainability of Idaho’s rural towns. “We’ve found that lot of parents are reluctant to have kids go on to higher education because they don’t want them to leave the community,” he says. “But having a trained workforce available there will make industries interested in those communities.”

Join Us in Coeur d’Alene for a Community Appreciation Event!

CDA Comm Apprec E-card

Viewers in the Coeur d’Alene area — You’re invited to join us for a casual reception with Idaho Public Television’s General Manager Ron Pisaneschi, Executive Producer Bruce Reichert, IdahoPTV board of directors and staff. Following the reception, enjoy an update on all the programming and community events that your support makes possible. We’ll also share a sneak peek of upcoming national and local productions, including a first look at a new Outdoor Idaho episode, Pend Oreille Country.

Sunday, September 16 at 6:30 PM

The Innovation Den – 418 E. Lakeside Ave, Coeur d’Alene

The event is free, but seating is limited. Please register online by Wednesday, September 12. Please phone us at (800) 543-6868 with any questions. We hope to see you there!

Explore the Beauty of Australia and Mexico in Two August Specials

OutbackMexico

Outback (three Wednesdays at 7 PM beginning August 1) explores Australia’s Kimberley region over the course of a year. This rugged northwestern section of Australia comes to life with spectacular wilderness and tough characters in The Kimberley Comes Alive (August 1). Turtles lay their eggs, cattle are prepared for rodeos, elite athletes dive for pearls, and a mother marsupial sets her babies free in The Dry Season (August 8). In Return of the Wet (August 15), watch as the Outback skies explode with thunder and rain, breaking the stifling heat, bringing relief to the animals and people, and beginning a new season in this ancient land.

Wonders of Mexico (three Wednesdays at 8 PM beginning August 1) travels along Mexico’s mountain spine, explores the tropical forests of the Maya, and journeys across the deserts of northern Mexico to discover its amazing wildlife and culture. Forests of the Maya (August 1) explores the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico’s far south, swathed in a forest stretching 50,000 square miles and once ruled by the mighty Maya civilization. Mountain Worlds (August 8) travels the rocky spine of the Sierra Madre mountain chain to discover an amazing diversity of life and culture. Burning North (August 15) journeys through the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts, introducing the animals that have adapted to the harsh conditions in order to thrive there.

Over-the-Air Signal Changes for McCall Area

Rescan - McCall

In August, the KAID-TV signal broadcasting from the translator at No Business Mountain will be re-channeled. This translator serves viewers in the McCall, Donnelly, Lake Fork and Meadows Valley areas.

Between August 10 and 25, viewers in these areas who receive the KAID signal via an over-the-air antenna will lose their signal and will need to perform a rescan of their digital TV sets or tuners in order to receive the updated channels.

Information on performing a rescan is located here: fcc.gov/rescan.

If the rescan does not display the new channel, it may be necessary to follow these additional steps:

  • Turn off the television set or converter box
  • Unplug the power to the TV or box
  • Disconnect the antenna from the TV or box
  • Wait 10 minutes
  • Plug the power back into the TV or box
  • Rescan the channels with the antenna still unattached
  • When the scan is complete, reattach the antenna and rescan channels again.

According to Rich Van Genderen, Idaho Public Television’s director of technology, the No Business Mountain translator serves the McCall/Donnelly area and is one of two units that repeat or translate the KAID-TV signal from Boise.  The other translator located on Brundage Mountain will remain unchanged with service offered on channel 11.

Last year, as part of the FCC’s nationwide Broadcast Spectrum Incentive Auction, telecommunications company T-Mobile purchased spectrum in the 600 MHz block across the continental United States to bolster their cellular network. The No Business translator sits right in the middle of T-Mobile’s purchased spectrum and is required to change channels no later than October 31 or terminate operations entirely.  IdahoPTV was successful in applying for and receiving a new channel assignment to remain whole in the area.

“A nod should be given to T-Mobile in that they graciously offered to pay for the equipment and services necessary to relocate our service to a new channel,” says Van Genderen. “So although this is an inconvenience, at least it isn’t an unfunded mandate for us to meet.”

Over-the-Air Signal Changes for Kellogg Area

Rescan - Kellogg

In August, the KUID-TV signal broadcasting from the translator at Wardner Peak will be re-channeled. This translator serves viewers in the Kellogg, Wardner, Pinehurst and Smelterville areas.

Between August 1 and 15, viewers in these areas who receive the KUID signal via an over-the-air antenna will lose their signal and will need to perform a rescan of their digital TV sets or tuners in order to receive the updated channels.

Information on performing a rescan is located here: fcc.gov/rescan.

If the rescan does not display the new channel, it may be necessary to follow these additional steps:

  • Turn off the television set or converter box
  • Unplug the power to the TV or box
  • Disconnect the antenna from the TV or box
  • Wait 10 minutes
  • Plug the power back into the TV or box
  • Rescan the channels with the antenna still unattached
  • When the scan is complete, reattach the antenna and rescan channels again.

According to Rich Van Genderen, Idaho Public Television’s director of technology, the Wardner Peak translator serves the Kellogg area and repeats or translates the KUID-TV signal from Moscow.

Last year, as part of the FCC’s nationwide Broadcast Spectrum Incentive Auction, telecommunications company T-Mobile purchased spectrum in the 600 MHz block across the continental United States to bolster their cellular network. The Kellogg translator sits right in the middle of T-Mobile’s purchased spectrum and is required to change channels no later than October 17, 2018.  IdahoPTV was successful in applying for and receiving a new channel assignment to remain whole in the Silver Valley area.

“A nod should be given to T-Mobile in that they graciously offered to pay for the equipment and services necessary to relocate our service to a new channel,” says Van Genderen. “So although this is an inconvenience, at least it isn’t an unfunded mandate for us to meet.”

Join us for ‘Kids Day’ at the Spirit of Boise Balloon Classic!

cd-balloon-hovercraft-kids-art

The Spirit of Boise Balloon Classic in Ann Morrison Park begins with CapEd Kids Day on Wednesday, August 29, from 7 to 9 AM. Kids can enjoy tethered rides aboard one of the many hot-air balloons.

Find the Idaho PBS KIDS Channel table sponsored by CapEd Credit Union and take home a free hovercraft activity! Keeping with the balloon theme, this science experiment from PBS KIDS Design Squad Global teaches the basics of propulsion and friction using a CD hovercraft propelled by an inflated balloon.

Pacific Time Zone Viewers: Daytime Schedule Changes

Pacific time change

Beginning August 1, our Pacific time zone viewers will notice a change in their daytime schedules on the IDAHO Channel. Prime-time schedules will remain the same.

Monday-Friday daytime programs (until 5:30 PM) and Saturday-Sunday daytime programs (until 5 PM) will air one hour later beginning in August. This will allow our IDAHO Channel to air programs at a consistent time in both time zones around the clock.

As an example, Curious George (which previously aired at 2:30/1:30 PM Mountain/Pacific) will now air at 2:30 PM in both time zones.