IdahoPTV Presented With Award for Creative Excellence by WorldFest

On Friday, November 22, WorldFest-Houston International Film Festival Executive Director Hunter Todd and Artistic Director Kathleen Haney presented a Special Jury Award for Outstanding Creative Excellence to Idaho Public Television for winning more Remi Awards for Creative Excellence than any other production company or television network in the 52 year history of the film festival.

WorldFest is the largest film and video competition in the world in terms of number of actual category entries, with more than 4,500 category entries received in 2019. There are 200 sub-categories for competition, allowing each film to compete in its own individual genre. WorldFest is also the film festival with the longest continuous management in the world with executive director Todd at the helm for 53 consecutive years. WorldFest began in August 1961 as an international film society, screening independent, foreign and art films.

“Idaho Public Television has consistently entered brilliant documentary and news programs in our international television competition over the past 25 years, and subsequently been awarded more Awards for Creative Excellence than any television network, production company or television producer group in the world!” Todd says. “IdahoPTV has produced programs dealing with all aspects of Idaho, its people, the countryside, its culture and way of life, the great natural beauty of the state, and the many unique people and places.”

Haney says, “Idaho Public Television has captured the very heart and soul of the great state of Idaho, its people and its beauty over the past several decades!”

The Board of Directors of WorldFest presented this Remi Special Jury Award for Creative Excellence to Idaho Public Television in the form of the Gold Remi Statuette, the symbol of the very best in production values in television, cable and the web. This marks the first time in the 53-year WorldFest history that such a Special Award has been made, representing more than 100 Remi Awards presented to Idaho Public Television over the past three decades.

Ron Pisaneschi, IdahoPTV general manager, says he is honored to accept this incredible award on behalf of his entire staff. “We display our awards from WorldFest on the walls of our Boise station because we are proud that such an important festival recognizes our efforts. This Special Jury Award was a complete surprise. We are thrilled that Chairman Hunter Todd and Artistic Director Kathleen Haney came all the way to Boise to present it.”

The Remi Award is named after Frederic Remington, the brilliant and creative artist who captured the spirit of Texas and the West with his exceptional paintings and sculptures.

Two-Part Interview With Author Barry Lopez Begins Friday

In the first of a two-part interview with acclaimed author Barry Lopez, Dialogue host Marcia Franklin talks with the National Book Award-winner about his newest book, “Horizon.” The sprawling memoir is both a look back at six regions of the world Lopez has written about, and a meditation on his concerns and hopes for the planet.

Lopez, the author of more than 15 books of fiction and non-fiction, won the National Book Award in 1986 for “Arctic Dreams.”

“Of Wolves and Men,” his seminal work on the complicated relationship between humans and wolves, was a finalist for the National Book Award in 1980.

Franklin talks with Lopez about his philosophy of writing, why he wanted to write “Horizon,” and his thoughts on global travel in an era of concern about climate change.

Part one of the interview airs Friday, November 22, at 8 PM on Dialogue. The second part of Franklin’s interview with Lopez will air next Friday, November 29.

The conversation was recorded at the 2019 Sun Valley Writers’ Conference. Franklin’s interviews conducted at that event since 2005 can be streamed here.

Memoirist Explores Issues of Family Secrets and Personal Identity

In a new episode of “Conversations From the Sun Valley Writers’ Conference” premiering Friday, Nov. 15, at 8 p.m. on Dialogue, host Marcia Franklin talks with author and Indiana University Bloomington associate professor Brando Skyhorse.

Skyhorse grew up believing he was the son of an activist in the American Indian movement. As a teenager, he learned that his biological father had been born in Mexico. He graduated from Stanford University and went on to earn a Master’s of Fine Arts in Writing, still passing himself off as Native American.

Skyhorse finally confronted his own story in a memoir called Take This Man, in which he tries to understand why his mother pretended that the two of them were Native American, and how that — along with abuse he suffered — affected his life.

The author also delves into the personalities of the five men he called “father,” and a discovery that changed his life forever.

The conversation was recorded at the 2019 Sun Valley Writers’ Conference. Franklin’s interviews conducted at that event since 2005 can be streamed here. The Dialogue interview airs again Sunday, Nov. 17, at 11 a.m. and will be available for streaming at video.idahoptv.org.

IdahoPTV and PBS Unveil Updated Look

PBS announced this week an update to its iconic brand, including a refreshed logo, bold color palette, custom typeface and illustration style. The new identity will roll out throughout 2020 on broadcast, streaming and web platforms as PBS celebrates its 50th anniversary.

Idaho Public Television — in coordination with the PBS brand refresh — this week began rolling out its own updated look, beginning with a fully redesigned website: idahoptv.org. The new site design is based on years of suggestions from users and feedback from testing groups that helped to improve navigation and usability. The site was created on a modern web platform that allows for more flexibility between viewing on differently sized devices.

The new IdahoPTV look will begin to roll out on local broadcasts in December.

When the changes are fully implemented, audiences will see an exciting new look and feel that spans broadcast, mobile and digital viewing, making it easier to identify and rediscover the PBS and IdahoPTV content they know and love across platforms. The new logo is an evolution of the iconic PBS symbol, reflective of the diverse perspectives PBS offers through its content.

An evolution of the PBS brand can be viewed here.

The updated brand is paired with “PBS” rendered in a custom type that’s more modern, prominent, and designed to be highly legible as it migrates across platforms. The new brand identity also features a new, vibrant signature color, PBS Blue, designed to convey a sense of trust and integrity.

“We believe PBS represents the best of what media is capable of, and this brand refresh demonstrates that,” said Connie Birdsall, global creative director at Lippincott, the agency responsible for the PBS rebranding. “We built the new visual identity to be flexible and modern for a brand that sits at the center of both broadcast and digital media, providing memorable visual brand cues that highlight PBS programming and unify local and national communities, who all share a love of PBS.”

Historian Illuminates Congress’ Violent Past on Next ‘Dialogue’

In a new episode of “Conversations From the Sun Valley Writers’ Conference” that premieres Friday, Nov. 8, at 8 p.m. on Dialogue, host Marcia Franklin talks with historian Joanne Freeman about her latest book, The Field of Blood. In the book, Freeman, a professor of history at Yale University, shows how the U.S. Congress before the Civil War was a more violent body than originally thought.

Freeman talks with Franklin about how she researched the book and whether her findings are applicable to the current political climate. She also discusses the value of studying history, and the focus of her next book on Alexander Hamilton. Freeman edited the Hamilton papers for a previous book, and was also featured in the PBS documentary “Hamilton’s America.”

The conversation was recorded at the 2019 Sun Valley Writers’ Conference. Franklin’s interviews conducted at that event since 2005 can be streamed here.

The Dialogue interview airs again Sunday, Nov. 10, at 11 a.m. and will be available for streaming at video.idahoptv.org.

Boise Teacher Selected as PBS KIDS Early Learning Champion

Grace Ruddy, a preschool teacher at Hawthorne Elementary School in the Boise School District, is one of ten educators from across the country to be named a 2019 PBS KIDS Early Learning Champion. Ruddy is the first Early Learning Champion to be selected from Idaho.

Established in 2018, this national awards program recognizes committed educators who work with young children, from infants to second graders. The program offers a variety of community building, leadership and professional learning opportunities provided by PBS KIDS and local member stations.

According to a statement from PBS, this year’s honorees were selected for their passion and commitment to early education and have each demonstrated outstanding impact in supporting the growth and learning of the whole child, strengthening the ecosystem in which children learn and creating unique and innovative teaching experiences.

Samantha Hill, Idaho Public Television’s community education specialist, says Ruddy launched a program in the Boise School District called “All Ready Preschool,” which ran at two schools from 2004 to 2011. In 2015, she worked with the City of Boise to develop the Boise Pre-K Project as part of the city’s Energize Our Neighborhoods Investment Program. Ruddy has taught preschool, first grade and second grade, and continues to provide training and support to new teachers.

“Grace is very purposeful in her teaching and interactions with students and families,” says Hill. “She worked with the family of a student to learn some basic phrases in their home language of Urdu. She was then able to communicate with the mother throughout the school year. Grace reported that after learning some of these phrases, her relationship with the whole family was enhanced. Her story impressed many of us at IdahoPTV, as it is just one of the many ways Grace works to meet the needs of all students and their families.”

The IdahoPTV education team is eager to partner with Ruddy to enhance the education of early learners and foster professional development relationships between Idaho teachers. In November, Ruddy and her fellow Early Learning Champions will be celebrated in Nashville at the National Association for Young Children Conference.

The 2019 PBS KIDS Early Learning Champions and their local PBS stations include:

  • Janalyn Maes, Hodgin Elementary School, Albuquerque, New Mexico (NMPBS)
  • Grace Ruddy, Hawthorne Elementary School, Boise, Idaho (IdahoPTV)
  • Alexandra Mindler, Wilson Area School District, Easton, Pennsylvania (WLVT)
  • Melissa Cardon, Little Bubbles, Bellevue, Nebraska (NET)
  • Cherika Watford, Harris Early Learning Center, Birmingham, Alabama (APTV)
  • Sarah Saenz, Head Start Kent County, Grand Rapids, Michigan (WGVU)
  • Felicia Gray, Burris Laboratory School, Muncie, Indiana (WIPB)
  • Claudia Robles Arias, BilingualKid Language Immersion School, Mechanicsville, Virginia (WCVE)
  • Kristen Valley, Boone Park Elementary School, North Little Rock, Arkansas (AETN)
  • Dee Liggens, Urban League of Greater Oklahoma City, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (OETA)

Idaho Novelist, Recipient of International Literary Prize, Featured on Next ‘Dialogue’

In a new episode of “Conversations From the Sun Valley Writers’ Conference” that premieres Friday, Nov. 1, at 8 p.m. on Dialogue, host Marcia Franklin talks with award-winning novelist Emily Ruskovich. An assistant professor in the Department of Theatre, Film and Creative Writing at Boise State University, Ruskovich is the author of the novel, Idaho. In 2019, it garnered the International Dublin Literary Award, which carries with it a prize of more than $100,000.

Franklin talks with Ruskovich about what it was like to win the award and how it has changed her life. The two also discuss the plot of Idaho, whose setting is based on the landscape of Ruskovich’s childhood on remote Hoodoo Mountain in northern Idaho. The story involves a mysterious murder of a young girl by her own mother, and the efforts of the father’s new wife to try and untangle what may have happened. Ruskovich also reflects on the process of writing the book.

The Dublin Literary Award judging panel called Idaho “a masterpiece on the redeeming and regenerative potential of music, poetry, literature and art.”

The conversation was recorded at the 2019 Sun Valley Writers’ Conference. Franklin’s interviews conducted at that event since 2005 can be streamed here.

The Dialogue interview airs again Sunday, Nov. 3, at 11 a.m. and will available for streaming at video.idahoptv.org.